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by IRWIN Z. ROTHENBERG, MBA, MS, CLS(ASCP) 

As we enter the third decade of the twenty-first century, the practice of medicine continues to undergo rapid change, led by advances in molecular diagnostics and genetics, enabling the practice of personalized medicine; advances in mobile and point of care testing technology, enabling medical care in remote as well as non-traditional settings; an ever-more intensely information-driven society where ready access to one’s personal medical information  is now expected, enabling and encouraging patient involvement  in their own healthcare; and finally, change is led by the growing realization of financial constraints due to demographic changes leading to the adoption of a value-based approach to healthcare delivery.

by BRANDON MCCUTCHEON, MD

If you are a physician or know a physician or have ever visited one, chances are you have probably heard them complain about technology in health care. More to the point, they are likely to be complaining about the one piece of technology that affects their lives minute-to-minute: the electronic health record (EHR). To get a sense of how central EHRs are to our daily routines, consider that physicians now spend more time in the EHR than they do seeing patients (6 hours of an average 11-hour work day). And while it is easy to write them off as luddites unable to adapt to new technology, an important study by the RAND organization noted that physicians approve of EHRs in principle and see the potential for the technology to improve the delivery of clinical care.